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Growing A Apple Tree From Seed

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Product Description: Growing An Apple ⁣Tree From Seed

Are you fascinated by⁣ the idea of nurturing and witnessing the growth of a bountiful apple tree right from ⁤its humble beginnings? ⁢Look no further because our “Growing An Apple Tree From Seed” kit is here to fulfill‍ your gardening dreams! With this kit, you can embark on a delightful and rewarding journey of growing your very own apple ⁤tree from a tiny seed.

Features:

1. All-in-One Kit: This comprehensive package includes all the essential ‌elements required for ⁤successfully growing ⁤an apple tree from seed. It consists of⁤ apple tree seeds,⁢ a nutrient-rich soil mix, biodegradable pots, plant markers, and ⁤a⁣ detailed step-by-step instruction booklet.

2. High-Quality Apple Tree Seeds: Our⁤ apple tree seeds are ‌carefully selected to ensure⁣ optimal quality and germination⁢ rates. These seeds come from reputable‍ sources and are known for producing healthy and thriving apple trees with delicious fruits.

3.⁢ Nutrient-Rich Soil Mix: ⁣We understand the⁣ significance of providing ​your apple tree with the right foundation to flourish. That’s why our kit includes ⁣a premium soil mix,

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In Backwoods Witchcraft, Jake Richards offers up a folksy stew of family stories, lore, omens, rituals, and conjure crafts that he learned from his great-grandmother, his grandmother, and his grandfather, a Baptist minister who Jake remembers could “rid someone of a fever with an egg or stop up the blood in a wound.” The witchcraft practiced in Appalachia is very much a folk magic of place, a tradition that honors the seen and unseen beings that inhabit the land as well as the soil, roots, and plant life.

The materials and tools used in Appalachia witchcraft are readily available from the land. This “grounded approach” will be of keen interest to witches and conjure folk regardless of where they live. Readers will be guided in how to build relationships with the spirits and other beings that dwell around them and how to use the materials and tools that are readily available on the land where one lives.

This book also provides instructions on how to create a working space and altar and make conjure oils and powders. A wide array of tried-and-true formulas are also offered for creating wealth, protecting one from gossip, spiritual cleansing, and more.

From the Publisher

appalachia, appalachian folk magic, conjuring, conjure, charms, superstitious, folklore, traditions

appalachia, appalachian folk magic, conjuring, conjure, charms, superstitious, folklore, traditions

jake richards, witch, witchcraft, appalachian folk magic, conjure, superstition

jake richards, witch, witchcraft, appalachian folk magic, conjure, superstition

Meet author Jake Richards

I grew up in East Tennessee in the valleys below Buffalo and Roan Mountain. My family was mostly farmers in Virginia, Tennessee, and North Carolina, some going back a good three hundred years. I spent most of my childhood at my great-grandmother’s house on the side of Big Ridge Mountain near Devil’s Nest in North Carolina. My family always spoke of the old wives’ tales and folk remedies; who could cure what or what to do if this or that happened. They were mountain people to the bone: hunters, farmers, blacksmiths, faith healers, preachers, and root diggers.

The unique thing about Appalachian folk magic is that there’s no one right way to do it. What I’m presenting in this book is what I have learned from my own family and gathered in my conversations with other mountain workers. You’ll learn the ways we watch the smoke, charm the fire, and stir the water to tell fortune and fates. You’ll see how we work the candles and lamps, cure unnatural illness, and jab those who do us wrong.

The bare bones of Appalachian folk magic. What it was and what it is. Superstition is the fuel behind folk magic.

lucky horseshoe, good luck, lucky, good fortune, hoodoo, protection, wives tales

lucky horseshoe, good luck, lucky, good fortune, hoodoo, protection, wives tales

bible, appalachian, appalachia, family tradition, charms, superstition, haints, graveyard, nightmare

bible, appalachian, appalachia, family tradition, charms, superstition, haints, graveyard, nightmare

salt superstition, american south, folk magic, uses for salt, good luck

salt superstition, american south, folk magic, uses for salt, good luck

divination, pagan practices, scattering, handkerchief, conjuring, apple seeds

divination, pagan practices, scattering, handkerchief, conjuring, apple seeds

Horseshoe for protection

Life in Appalachia was hard enough without the extra misfortune that fate dealt. Closely following the concept of protection, there are tricks and wits to bring good luck and keep misfortune away. My grandmothers always hung horseshoes pointing upward to keep the luck from running out.

The Bible is more than a book

The Bible is much more than a book in Appalachia. It is heritage and an extension of the family. Often time family bibles held the only records for births, marriages and deaths among other important life events. It also served as a charm protecting against haints and nightmares if placed under the mattress.

Salt is common in folk magic

Salt is common in folk magic the world over, and in all of those places, as well as Appalachia, it’s good for just about anything. Richards Nana used to line the front and back doors with salt for protection, or sprinkle it at the four inside corners of the home in a pile and set a penny up on top for good luck and money. “Salt does what you tell it to” is a well-known saying throughout the American South.

Scattering forms of divination

You can also utilize the “scattering” forms of divination, which entail tossing sunflower or apple seeds on a handkerchief after whispering your question into them. If the seeds are evenly spaced out after landing, it means yes; but if they land in groups or “clods,” it is a no.

Stories and superstitions often intersect, like a complex dream catcher. Discover just how powerful superstitions and wives tales really are.

healing food, spells, magic recipes, home cure, food superstitions

healing food, spells, magic recipes, home cure, food superstitions

rags, curses, charm bags, good luck, conjuring, witchcraft

rags, curses, charm bags, good luck, conjuring, witchcraft

river superstitions, folk magic

river superstitions, folk magic

spells, spell casting, conjure, conjuring, magic remedies, magic recipes

spells, spell casting, conjure, conjuring, magic remedies, magic recipes

Food is an important heritage

Food is as important to hill folks heritage as the stories passed down to us. Food is the embodied struggle and poverty of the people, but it is also the love and pride taken in caring for oneself and their upbringing. It is comfort for grief and a sign of hospitality and comradery in community and in the seams of our family history.

Rags are commonly used

Rags can also be used to curse one’s enemies, provide healing from illness, conjure up a rainstorm, and catch the morning dew to be used in love and healing works. Normally, it was a washcloth or kitchen towel that was used again and again, as it was thought to get stronger and stronger with each use. Handkerchiefs and flannel were the most common types of fabric used. Flannel was believed to bring good luck all on its own, so most charm bags are crafted with flannel from old shirts.

Rivers are places of cleansing

The Little Doe River in Cate’s Cove on Roan Mountain; rivers are places of cleansing, bringing and taking. Many folks still today will go pray in the water or are baptized there. The Cherokee knew it as the Long Man, a spirit who aided in many cures and charms, especially in healing diseases.

Appalachian stump water

A Tree stump with a pool of rain water, known in Appalachia as Stump water or Spunk water. This water is often used to wash one’s hair for hair growth, wash off worts, and heal other ailments. It’s believed to hold these qualities because it is “flying water” as the Cherokee say, water that has never touched the earth and still retains the virtues of the heavens.

Publisher ‏ : ‎ Weiser Books; 1st edition (June 1, 2019)
Language ‏ : ‎ English
Paperback ‏ : ‎ 240 pages
ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 1578636531
ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1578636532
Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 12 ounces
Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 6 x 0.5 x 8.75 inches

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