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Best Scientific Word For Bugs

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Product Description:

Introducing the “Best Scientific Word for Bugs,” ⁤the ultimate ⁤reference guide for all‌ entomologists, students, and enthusiasts who crave accuracy and precision when it comes to the fascinating world of bugs. This comprehensive tool‌ provides you‍ with the most accurate scientific terminology ⁤for bugs, ensuring that you are always armed with the ⁢right word to describe these⁤ incredible creatures.

Features of the “Best Scientific Word for Bugs”:

1. Extensive Bug Terminology: This reference guide is ‌packed with an extensive collection of scientific terms specific to bugs. From the commonly ‍known ants, beetles,⁣ and butterflies to the lesser-known species, this ⁢resource covers an array of insect families, orders, and‌ genera, leaving no stone unturned.

2. ‍Accurate and Up-to-Date Information: The “Best‍ Scientific Word for Bugs” is meticulously curated by expert entomologists who have dedicated their lives to the study of insects. The terminology provided is derived from the latest research, ensuring that you have the most up-to-date⁢ vocabulary⁤ at your fingertips.

3. User-Friendly Organization: With a logical⁣ and user-friendly layout

Product Description For Best Scientific Word For Bugs

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Dive into the world of creepy-crawlies in this Encyclopedia of Insects. 

Packed with hundreds of bugs, every one is looked at in fascinating detail by natural history expert Jules Howard. 

From the cutest and most beautiful, to the deadliest and most disgusting, there’s something for everyone in this book which highlights the importance of the insect world. Plus, find out what actually makes an insect, an insect – with guest entries from the non-insects: centipedes, spiders, woodlice, and snails. 

Featuring 300 bugs!

From the Publisher

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ENCYCLOPEDIA of INSECTS

Together with beautiful painted illustrations provided by Miranda Zimmerman, we want to inspire you to look out for and study these unsung heroes of the natural world. To come to know them. To know their names. To shout from the rooftops about how amazing they are. And, hopefully, to give a helping hand in bringing them back to a former glory. This really is the Planet of the Insects, after all. I hope, through books like this one, that we can keep it that way

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Get to know insects

To love something, you first of all have to spend some time with it. Soak up as much as you can about insects, using books like this one or by studying those insects closest to you, in your garden or school grounds. If you don’t know what insect species you are looking at, then sketch an illustration or take a photo and send it to a local museum. Often, they will be delighted to help you work out what sort of insect it is

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Make your neighborhood insect-friendly

Insects love places to feed, places to hide and places to lay their eggs. You can encourage insects into your garden or local area by planting lots of wildflowers where pollinating insects can gather nectar and by adding wood piles in which they can seek shelter. If you have a grass lawn, consider letting some areas grow long to provide places for insects to hide and keep cool in the summer sun.

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Take part in citizen science!

Many of the facts in this book have been gathered by amateur insect-lovers working together to discover new things. For instance, to help understand how far the painted lady butterfly (see page 115) migrates, teams of people across Europe kept a lookout for them and reported when and where they saw them flying. This so-called citizen science is likely to become very important in helping scientists discover new things about insects. Your school or local museum might be able to tell you of citizen science schemes that you can join.

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WHAT IS AN INSECT?

Insects can be told apart from other armoured invertebrates such as spiders and crabs by looking for the key features you can see on this page.

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Mayflies (Ephemeroptera)

Mayflies first appeared in the world long before dinosaurs, more than 300 million years ago. Mayflies live most of their life underwater as nymphs. Some species live only a few days as flying adults, hence the word ‘ephemero’ in their scientific name – ‘ephemeral’means ‘short-lived’

Dragonflies (OdonatA)

Dragonflies are skilled aerial predators that fly upon powerful wings which allow them to hover in search of prey, before quickly giving chase. In all, 3,000 species live today. Dragonflies are associated with freshwater because their nymphs are aquatic

Damselflies (OdonatA)

There are almost 3,000 species of damselfly on Earth and each is a dynamic aerial hunter of other invertebrates. Damselflies can be told apart from dragonflies because most damselflies rest their wings against their body when they land. Dragonflies, on the other hand, rest with their wings held outwards like an aeroplane.

Grasshoppers (Orthoptera)

In all, approximately 11,000 grasshopper species are known today and nearly all species are capable of making giant leaps courtesy of their long back legs. In the early days of the dinosaurs, grasshoppers were one of the first insects to hit upon a plant-eating way of life.

Publisher ‏ : ‎ Wide Eyed Editions; Illustrated edition (June 2, 2020)
Language ‏ : ‎ English
Hardcover ‏ : ‎ 160 pages
ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 0711249156
ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-0711249158
Reading age ‏ : ‎ 7 – 11 years
Grade level ‏ : ‎ 2 – 6
Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 1.55 pounds
Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 7.85 x 0.95 x 10.05 inches

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